Services

Endoscopy procedures include upper and lower GI and are associated with the following services:
 

Gold-Standard Colon Cancer Prevention and Detection


Gastroenterology


EGD

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), also known as upper endoscopy, enables the physician to look inside the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (first part of the intestine). The procedure might be used to discover and possibly treat the reason for swallowing difficulties, nausea, vomiting, reflux, bleeding, indigestion, abdominal pain, or chest pain.

A thin, flexible, lighted tube called an endoscope will be used for the procedure. Right before the procedure the physician will spray your throat with a numbing agent that may help prevent gagging. You will receive medicine to sedate you during the exam. The endoscope transmits an image of the inside of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, so the physician can examine the lining of these organs. The scope also blows air into the stomach; this expands the folds of tissue and makes it easier for the physician to examine the stomach.

The physician can see abnormalities, like ulcers, through the endoscope that don't show up well on x-rays. The physician can also insert instruments into the scope to remove samples of tissue (biopsy) for further tests. The physician may also use instruments to stop bleeding.

Your stomach and duodenum must be empty for the procedure to be thorough and safe. Please see the EGD preparation instructions for complete details. You may resume your normal diet after the procedure, unless advised otherwise.

The procedure takes 5-20 minutes; however, you should be prepared to be at the Endoscopy Center for 2 -3 hours. Because you will be sedated, you will need to rest at the Center for approximately thirty minutes until the medication wears off. Also, you must arrange for someone to take you home--you will not be allowed to drive because of the sedatives, The day after your procedure, you may return to work or school and your other normal activities. Your physician may give you other special instructions.

If biopsies were taken during the procedure, we normally receive the results within 7-10 business days. After your physician reviews the report, we will call you with results.
 

Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy lets the physician look inside your entire large intestine, from the lowest part, the rectum, all the way through the colon to the lower end of the small intestine. The procedure is used t0 diagnose the causes of unexplained changes in bowel habits, signs of cancer in the colon and rectum, inflamed tissue, abnormal growths, ulcer, bleeding, and muscle spasms.

For the procedure, you will lie on your left side on the examining table. You will be given medication to keep you comfortable and to sedate you during the exam. The physician will insert a long, flexible tube into your rectum and slowly guide it through your colon. The scope also blows air into your colon, which inflates the colon and helps the physician see better. Most of the air is removed after the examination is finished.

If anything unusual is in your colon, like a polyp or inflamed tissue, the physician can remove it using tiny instruments passed through the scope. That tissue (biopsy) is then sent to a lab for testing. If there is bleeding in the colon, the physician can use instruments through the scope to stop the bleeding.

Your colon must be completely empty for the colonoscopy to be thorough and safe. To prepare for the procedure, you must follow a clear liquid diet and use a laxative solution on the day before the procedure. A clear liquid diet means fat-free bouillon or broth, Jello or Popsicles (any color except red, blue, purple or orange), strained fruit juice, water, plain coffee, plain tea, or soda (any kind). Please see the colonoscopy preparation instructions for complete details.

Colonoscopy takes 10-45 minutes; however, you will need to plan to be at the Endoscopy Center for 2 1/2-3 hours. The medicine given for sedation should keep you from feeling discomfort during the exam. The majority of patients remember nothing about the procedure.

You will need to remain at the Endoscopy Center for approximately one hour afterward, until the medication wears off. Also, you must arrange for someone to take you home afterward-- you will not be allowed to drive because of the sedative. You may resume your normal diet after the procedure. The day after the procedure, you may return to work or school and your other normal activities; however, if biopsies were taken, you will need to avoid heavy lifting (over 25 pounds). Your physician may give you other special instructions.

If biopsies were taken during your procedure, we normally receive the results within 7-10 business days. After your physician has reviewed the report, we will call you with results.